Open Access Original Research

Troponin utilization in patients presenting with atrial fibrillation/flutter to the emergency department: retrospective chart review

Nazanin Meshkat1*, Emily Austin2, Rahim Moineddin3, Hamidreza Hatamabadi4, Behzad Hassani5, Ali Abdalvand6 and Amanda Marcuzzi7

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Medicine, Division of Emergency Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

2 Queen's University, Kingston, Canada

3 Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

4 Division of Emergency Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran

5 University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

6 Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran

7 York Central Hospital, Toronto, Canada

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International Journal of Emergency Medicine 2011, 4:25  doi:10.1186/1865-1380-4-25

Published: 8 June 2011

Abstract

Background

There are few recommendations about the use of cardiac markers in the investigation and management of atrial fibrillation/flutter. Currently, it is unknown how many patients with atrial fibrillation/flutter undergo troponin testing, and how positive troponin results are managed in the emergency department. We sought to look at the emergency department troponin utilization patterns.

Methods

We performed a retrospective chart review of patients with atrial fibrillation/flutter presenting to the emergency department at three centers. Outcome measures included the rates of troponins ordered by emergency doctors, number of positive troponins, and those with positive troponins treated as acute coronary syndrome (ACS) by consulting services.

Results

Four hundred fifty-one charts were reviewed. A total of 388 (86%) of the patients had troponins ordered, 13.7% had positive results, and 4.9% were treated for ACS.

Conclusions

Troponin tests are ordered in a high percentage of patients with atrial fibrillation/flutter presenting to emergency departments. Five percent of our total patient cohort was diagnosed as having acute coronary syndrome by consulting services.