Open Access Highly Accessed Original Research

TBI surveillance using the common data elements for traumatic brain injury: a population study

Latha Ganti Stead126*, Aakash N Bodhit12, Pratik Shashikant Patel12, Yasamin Daneshvar12, Keith R Peters167, Anna Mazzuoccolo12, Sudeep Kuchibhotla1, Christa Pulvino1, Kelsey Hatchitt1, Lawrence Lottenberg13, Marie-Carmelle Elie-Turenne12, Robyn M Hoelle12, Abhijna Vedula12, Andrea Gabrielli4, Bayard D Miller5, John H Slish12, Michael Falgiani12, Tricia Falgiani12, J Adrian Tyndall12 and Emergency Medicine Traumatic Brain Injury Research Network Investigators

Author Affiliations

1 Center for Brain Injury Research and Education, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USA

2 Departments of Emergency Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USA

3 Departments of Acute Care Surgery, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USA

4 Departments of Anesthesiology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USA

5 Departments of Neurology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USA

6 Departments of Neurological Surgery, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USA

7 Departments of Radiology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USA

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International Journal of Emergency Medicine 2013, 6:5  doi:10.1186/1865-1380-6-5

Published: 27 February 2013

Abstract

Background

To characterize the patterns of presentation of adults with head injury to the Emergency Department.

Methods

This is a cohort study that sought to collect injury and outcome variables with the goal of characterizing the very early natural history of traumatic brain injury in adults. This IRB-approved project was conducted in collaboration with our Institution’s Center for Translational Science Institute. Data were entered in REDCap, a secure database. Statistical analyses were performed using JMP 10.0 pro for Windows.

Results

The cohort consisted of 2,394 adults, with 40% being women and 79% Caucasian. The most common mechanism was fall (47%) followed by motor vehicle collision (MVC) (36%). Patients sustaining an MVC were significantly younger than those whose head injury was secondary to a fall (P < 0.0001). Ninety-one percent had CT imaging; hemorrhage was significantly more likely with worse severity as measured by the Glasgow Coma Score (chi-square, P < 0.0001). Forty-four percent were admitted to the hospital, with half requiring ICU admission. In-hospital death was observed in 5.4%, while neurosurgical intervention was required in 8%. For all outcomes, worse TBI severity per GCS was significantly associated with worse outcomes (logistic regression, P < 0.0001, adjusted for age).

Conclusion

These cohort data highlight the burden of TBI in the Emergency Department and provide important demographic trends for further research.